toadying

toady

[toh-dee]
noun, plural toadies.
1.
an obsequious flatterer; sycophant.
verb (used with object), toadied, toadying.
2.
to be the toady to.
verb (used without object), toadied, toadying.
3.
to be a toady.

Origin:
1680–90; toad + -y2

toadyish, adjective
toadyism, noun
untoadying, adjective


1. fawner, yes man, parasite, apple polisher.
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World English Dictionary
toady (ˈtəʊdɪ)
 
n , pl toadies
1.  a person who flatters and ingratiates himself or herself in a servile way; sycophant
 
vb , toadies, toadies, toadying, toadied
2.  to fawn on and flatter (someone)
 
[C19: shortened from toadeater]
 
'toadyish
 
adj
 
'toadyism
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

toady
"servile parasite," 1826, apparently shortened from toad-eater "fawning flatterer" (1742), originally referring to the assistant of a charlatan, who ate a toad (believed to be poisonous) to enable his master to display his skill in expelling the poison (1629). The verb is recorded from 1827.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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