follow Dictionary.com

8 Wintry Words to Defrost Your Vocabulary

Pride

[prahyd] /praɪd/
noun
1.
Thomas, died 1658, English soldier and regicide.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
British Dictionary definitions for tom pride

pride

/praɪd/
noun
1.
a feeling of honour and self-respect; a sense of personal worth
2.
excessive self-esteem; conceit
3.
a source of pride
4.
satisfaction or pleasure taken in one's own or another's success, achievements, etc (esp in the phrase take (a) pride in)
5.
the better or most superior part of something; flower
6.
the most flourishing time
7.
a group (of lions)
8.
the mettle of a horse; courage; spirit
9.
(archaic) sexual desire, esp in a female animal
10.
(archaic) display, pomp, or splendour
11.
pride of place, the most important position
verb
12.
(transitive; foll by on or upon) to take pride in (oneself) for
13.
(intransitive) to glory or revel (in)
Derived Forms
prideful, adjective
pridefully, adverb
Word Origin
Old English prӯda; related to Latin prodesse to be useful, Old Norse prūthr stately; see proud

Pride

/praɪd/
noun
1.
Thomas. died 1658, English soldier on the Parliamentary side during the Civil War. He expelled members of the Long Parliament hostile to the army (Pride's Purge, 1648) and signed Charles I's death warrant
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for tom pride

pride

n.

late Old English pryto, Kentish prede, Mercian pride "pride, haughtiness, pomp," from prud (see proud). There is debate whether Scandinavian cognates (Old Norse pryði, Old Swedish prydhe , Danish pryd, etc.) are borrowed from Old French (from Germanic) or from Old English. Meaning "that which makes a person or people most proud" is from c.1300. First applied to groups of lions late 15c., but not commonly so used until c.1930. Paired with prejudice from 1610s.

v.

mid-12c. in the reflexive sense "congratulate (oneself), be proud," c.1200 as "be arrogant, act haughtily," from pride (n.). Related: Prided; priding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Idioms and Phrases with tom pride
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for Pride

All English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for tom

5
6
Scrabble Words With Friends