tomb

[toom]
noun
1.
an excavation in earth or rock for the burial of a corpse; grave.
2.
a mausoleum, burial chamber, or the like.
3.
a monument for housing or commemorating a dead person.
4.
any sepulchral structure.
verb (used with object)
5.
to place in or as if in a tomb; entomb; bury.

Origin:
1225–75; Middle English tumbe < Anglo-French; Old French tombe < Late Latin tumba < Greek týmbos burial mound; akin to Latin tumēre to swell. See tumor, tumulus

tombal, adjective
tombless, adjective
tomblike, adjective
untombed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
tomb (tuːm)
 
n
1.  a place, esp a vault beneath the ground, for the burial of a corpse
2.  a stone or other monument to the dead
3.  the tomb a poetic term for death
4.  anything serving as a burial place: the sea was his tomb
 
vb
5.  rare (tr) to place in a tomb; entomb
 
[C13: from Old French tombe, from Late Latin tumba burial mound, from Greek tumbos; related to Latin tumēre to swell, Middle Irish tomm hill]
 
'tomblike
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

tomb
c.1275, from Anglo-Fr. tumbe, O.Fr. tombe (12c.), from L.L. tumba (cf. It. tomba, Fr. tombe, Sp. tumba), from Gk. tymbos "burial mound, grave, tomb," from PIE base *teu- "to swell" (see thigh). The final -b began to be silent 14c. (cf. lamb,
dumb). The Tombs, slang for "New York City prison" is recorded from 1840. A tombstone (1565) originally was a horizontal stone covering a grave (or the lid of a stone coffin); meaning "gravestone, headstone" is attested from 1711.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Tombs definition


of the Hebrews were generally excavated in the solid rock, or were natural caves. Mention is made of such tombs in Judg. 8:32; 2 Sam. 2:32; 2 Kings 9:28; 23:30. They were sometimes made in gardens (2 Kings 21:26; 23:16; Matt. 27:60). They are found in great numbers in and around Jerusalem and all over the land. They were sometimes whitewashed (Matt. 23:27, 29). The body of Jesus was laid in Joseph's new rock-hewn tomb, in a garden near to Calvary. All evidence is in favour of the opinion that this tomb was somewhere near the Damascus gate, and outside the city, and cannot be identified with the so-called "holy sepulchre." The mouth of such rocky tombs was usually closed by a large stone (Heb. golal), which could only be removed by the united efforts of several men (Matt. 28:2; comp. John 11:39). (See GOLGOTHA.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
The warehouses hold material from archaeological digs, for example fragments of
  loose wall reliefs from tombs.
These signs of life are unmistakably distinct from their stony tombs.
Some tombs and city walls that were reinforced with the stuff are still
  standing.
They spent a week smiling at the cameras, visiting their birthplaces and
  praying at ancestral tombs.
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