toms

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Tom

[tom]
noun
2.
a male given name, form of Thomas.
verb (used without object), Tommed, Tomming.
3.
(often lowercase) to act like an Uncle Tom.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
tom1 (tɒm)
 
n
a.  the male of various animals, esp the cat
 b.  (as modifier): a tom turkey
 c.  (in combination): a tomcat
 
[C16: special use of the shortened form of Thomas, applied to any male, often implying a common or ordinary type of person, etc]

tom2 (tɒm)
 
n
(Austral), (NZ) a temporary supporting post
 
[from a specialized use of tom1]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Tom
familiar shortening of masc. proper name Thomas, used by late 14c. as a type of a nickname for a common man. Applied 17c. as a nickname for several exceptionally large bells. Short for Uncle Tom in the sense of "black man regarded as too servile to whites" is recorded from
1959. Tom Walker, U.S. Southern colloquial for "the devil" is recorded from 1833. Tom and Jerry is first attested 1828 in many extended senses, originally the names of the two chief characters (Corinthian Tom and Jerry Hawthorn) in Pierce Egan's "Life in London" (1821); the U.S. cat and mouse cartoon characters debuted 1940 in "Puss Gets the Boot." Tom Thumb (1570s) was a miniature man in popular tradition before P.T. Barnum took the name for a dwarf he exhibited.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

Watson Wat·son (wŏt'sən), James Dewey. Born 1928.

American biologist who with Francis Crick proposed a spiral model, the double helix, for the molecular structure of DNA. He shared a 1962 Nobel Prize for advances in the study of genetics.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
Adams   (ād'əmz)  Pronunciation Key 
American astronomer who demonstrated that the essential brightness of a star could be calculated by studying its spectrum and who introduced a method for measuring the distance of stars based on their brightness. In 1915 he discovered Sirius B, the first known white dwarf star, and his measurement of the gravitational red shift in the light leaving its surface was accepted as evidence for Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity.
Watson   (wŏt'sən)  Pronunciation Key 
American biologist who, working with Francis Crick, identified the structure of DNA in 1953. By analyzing the patterns cast by x-rays striking DNA molecules, they discovered that DNA has the structure of a double helix, two spirals linked together by bases in ladderlike rungs. For this work Watson and Crick shared with Maurice Wilkins the 1962 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Abbreviations & Acronyms
TOMS
total ozone mapping spectrophotometer
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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