Tormentedly

torment

[v. tawr-ment, tawr-ment; n. tawr-ment]
verb (used with object)
1.
to afflict with great bodily or mental suffering; pain: to be tormented with violent headaches.
2.
to worry or annoy excessively: to torment one with questions.
3.
to throw into commotion; stir up; disturb.
noun
4.
a state of great bodily or mental suffering; agony; misery.
5.
something that causes great bodily or mental pain or suffering.
6.
a source of much trouble, worry, or annoyance.
7.
an instrument of torture, as the rack or the thumbscrew.
8.
the infliction of torture by means of such an instrument or the torture so inflicted.

Origin:
1250–1300; (noun) Middle English < Old French < Latin tormentum rope, catapult, torture < *torkw-ment- (see torque, -ment); (v.) Middle English tormenten < Old French tormenter, derivative of torment (compare Late Latin tormentāre)

tormentedly, adverb
tormentingly, adverb
tormentingness, noun
untormented, adjective
untormenting, adjective
untormentingly, adverb


1. harry, hector, vex, distress, agonize. T orment , rack , torture suggest causing great physical or mental pain, suffering, or harassment. T o torment is to afflict or harass as by incessant repetition of vexations or annoyances: to be tormented by doubts. T o rack is to affect with such pain as that suffered by one stretched on a rack; to concentrate with painful effort: to rack one's brains. T o torture is to afflict with acute and more or less protracted suffering: to torture one by keeping one in suspense. 2. plague, pester, tease, provoke, needle, trouble, fret. 4. torture, distress, anguish.


1. please.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
torment
 
vb
1.  to afflict with great pain, suffering, or anguish; torture
2.  to tease or pester in an annoying way: stop tormenting the dog
 
n
3.  physical or mental pain
4.  a source of pain, worry, annoyance, etc
5.  archaic an instrument of torture
6.  archaic the infliction of torture
 
[C13: from Old French, from Latin tormentum, from torquēre]
 
tor'mented
 
adj
 
tor'mentedly
 
adv
 
tor'menting
 
adj, —n
 
tor'mentingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

torment
late 13c., "inflicting of torture," also "state of great suffering," from O.Fr. tourment (11c.), from L. tormentum "twisted sling, rack," related to torquere "to twist" (see thwart). The verb is first recorded late 13c., from O.Fr. tormenter (12c.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Torment definition


Gr. basanos (Matt. 4:24), the "touch-stone" of justice; hence inquisition by torture, and then any disease which racks and tortures the limbs.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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