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tottery

[tot-uh-ree] /ˈtɒt ə ri/
adjective
1.
tottering; shaky.
Origin of tottery
1745-1755
1745-55; totter + -y1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for tottery
Historical Examples
  • But before ten days were gone, even the woman Ipsukuk exhausted her provisions, and went home weak and tottery.

    The Faith of Men Jack London
  • Cash was tottery weak from his own illness, and he could not speak above a whisper.

    Cabin Fever B. M. Bower
  • His eyes were bulging, and he was tottery on his feet, swaying from side to side and still making a fight with his hands.

    Smoke Bellew Jack London
  • When I did get up, I felt so tottery that I could hardly keep my feet.

  • The Captain was a tottery old man, past the age for any fundamental joy.

    Birthright T.S. Stribling
  • I found him first, a little withered, dried-up old fellow, wrinkled-faced and bleary-eyed and tottery.

    Before Adam Jack London
  • In this way the ghost of the victim, whose things are carried in the bundle, is supposed to make their enemies weak and tottery.

  • Through a barred window the wondering warden sourly watched the crawling, tottery figure.

    The Escape of Mr. Trimm Irvin S. Cobb
  • He tried to stand, but found he was too tottery on his legs.

    The White Crystals Howard R. Garis
  • What a precious experience now this would have been for a tottery, talkative, owlish old parochial creature like me.

    The Return Walter de la Mare
Word Origin and History for tottery
adj.

1861, from totter + -y (2).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for tottery

10
9
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