traitor

[trey-ter]
noun
1.
a person who betrays another, a cause, or any trust.
2.
a person who commits treason by betraying his or her country.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English < Old French < Latin trāditōr-, stem of trāditor betrayer. See traditor

traitorship, noun
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World English Dictionary
traitor (ˈtreɪtə)
 
n
a person who is guilty of treason or treachery, in betraying friends, country, a cause or trust, etc
 
[C13: from Old French traitour, from Latin trāditortraditor]
 
'traitorous
 
adj
 
'traitorously
 
adv
 
'traitorship
 
n
 
'traitress
 
fem n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

traitor
early 13c., from O.Fr. traitor (11c.), from L. traditorem (nom. traditor) "betrayer," lit. "one who delivers," from stem of tradere "deliver, surrender" (see tradition). Originally usually with a suggestion of Judas Iscariot.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
They were civic-minded enough to be offended and depressed about being called
  traitors.
And some few others who were rather active traitors.
If they are trying to uncover the traitors in their own ranks who may have
  squealed on them, well, that's their business.
The triple disaster has also split apart once closeknit communities-some who
  stay consider those who leave to be traitors.
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