tram-pled

trample

[tram-puhl]
verb (used without object), trampled, trampling.
1.
to tread or step heavily and noisily; stamp.
2.
to tread heavily, roughly, or crushingly (usually followed by on, upon, or over ): to trample on a flower bed.
3.
to act in a harsh, domineering, or cruel manner, as if treading roughly (usually followed by on, upon, or over ): to trample on another's feelings.
verb (used with object), trampled, trampling.
4.
to tread heavily, roughly, or carelessly on or over; tread underfoot.
5.
to domineer harshly over; crush: to trample law and order.
6.
to put out or extinguish by trampling (usually followed by out ): to trample out a fire.
noun
7.
the act of trampling.
8.
the sound of trampling.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English tramplen to stamp (cognate with German trampeln); see tramp, -le

trampler, noun
untrampled, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
trample (ˈtræmpəl)
 
vb (when intr, usually foll by on, upon, or over)
1.  to stamp or walk roughly (on): to trample the flowers
2.  to encroach (upon) so as to violate or hurt: to trample on someone's feelings
 
n
3.  the action or sound of trampling
 
[C14: frequentative of tramp; compare Middle High German trampeln]
 
'trampler
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

trample
1382, "to walk heavily," frequentative form of tramp. Transitive sense is first found 1530.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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