transgress

[trans-gres, tranz-]
verb (used without object)
1.
to violate a law, command, moral code, etc.; offend; sin.
verb (used with object)
2.
to pass over or go beyond (a limit, boundary, etc.): to transgress bounds of prudence.
3.
to go beyond the limits imposed by (a law, command, etc.); violate; infringe: to transgress the will of God.

Origin:
1520–30; < Latin trānsgressus (past participle of trānsgredī to step across), equivalent to trāns- trans- + -gred- (combining form of gradī to step; see grade) + -tus past participle suffix, with dt > ss

transgressive, adjective
transgressively, adverb
transgressor, noun
nontransgressive, adjective
nontransgressively, adverb
untransgressed, adjective


1. err, trespass. 3. contravene, disobey.


3. obey.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
transgress (trænzˈɡrɛs)
 
vb
1.  to break (a law, rule, etc)
2.  to go beyond or overstep (a limit)
 
[C16: from Latin transgredī, from trans- + gradī to step]
 
trans'gressor
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Example sentences
He transgressed in using his fame as a performer to advance his social agenda.
As sea level transgressed, the surface sediments were reworked by wave action.
Not every statutory limitation creates a private right of action for one who is harmed when the limits are transgressed.
In my view, the right of parents to be involved in these major decisions is fundamental and ought not be lightly transgressed.
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