tripes

tripe

[trahyp]
noun
1.
the first and second divisions of the stomach of a ruminant, especially oxen, sheep, or goats, used as food. Compare honeycomb tripe, plain tripe.
2.
Slang. something, especially speech or writing, that is false or worthless; rubbish.

Origin:
1250–1300; 1885–90 for def 2; Middle English < Old French < ?

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World English Dictionary
tripe (traɪp)
 
n
1.  the stomach lining of an ox, cow, or other ruminant, prepared for cooking
2.  informal something silly; rubbish
3.  archaic, informal (plural) intestines; belly
 
[C13: from Old French, of unknown origin]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

tripe
c.1300, from O.Fr. tripe "entrails used as food" (13c.), of unknown origin, perhaps via Sp. tripa from Arabic therb "suet" (but also said to mean "fold of a piece of cloth"). Applied contemptuously to persons (1595), then to anything considered worthless, foolish, or offensive (1892).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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