triumpher

triumph

[trahy-uhmf, -uhmf]
noun
1.
the act, fact, or condition of being victorious or triumphant; victory; conquest.
2.
a significant success or noteworthy achievement; instance or occasion of victory.
3.
exultation resulting from victory; joy over success.
4.
Roman History. the ceremonial entrance into Rome of a victorious commander with his army, spoils of war, and captives, authorized by the senate in honor of an important military or naval victory. Compare ovation ( def 2 ).
5.
a public pageant, spectacle, or the like.
verb (used without object)
6.
to gain a victory; be victorious; win.
7.
to gain mastery; prevail: to triumph over fear.
8.
to be successful; achieve success.
9.
to exult over victory; rejoice over success.
10.
to be elated or glad; rejoice proudly; glory.
11.
to celebrate a triumph, as a victorious Roman commander.
verb (used with object)
12.
to conquer; triumph over.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English triumphe (noun), Old English triumpha < Latin triump(h)us, perhaps < Etruscan < Greek thríambos hymn to Dionysus

triumpher, noun


1. success. See victory. 3. jubilation, celebration. 6. succeed.


1. defeat, loss.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
triumph (ˈtraɪəmf)
 
n
1.  the feeling of exultation and happiness derived from a victory or major achievement
2.  the act or condition of being victorious; victory
3.  (in ancient Rome) a ritual procession to the Capitoline Hill held in honour of a victorious general
4.  obsolete a public display or celebration
5.  cards an obsolete word for trump
 
vb
6.  (often foll by over) to win a victory or control: to triumph over one's weaknesses
7.  to rejoice over a victory
8.  to celebrate a Roman triumph
 
[C14: from Old French triumphe, from Latin triumphus, from Old Latin triumpus; probably related to Greek thriambos Bacchic hymn]
 
'triumpher
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

triumph
late 14c., from O.Fr. triumphe (12c.), from L. triumphus "achievement, a success, procession for a victorious general or admiral," earlier triumpus, probably via Etruscan from Gk. thriambos "hymn to Dionysus," a loan-word from a pre-Hellenic language. Sense of "victory, conquest" is c.1400. The verb
is first recorded late 15c. Related: Triumphed; triumphing.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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