trow

trow

[troh]
verb (used without object), verb (used with object) Archaic.
to believe, think, or suppose.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English trowen, Old English trēow(i)an to believe, derivative of trēow belief; akin to Old Norse trūa, German trauen, Gothic trauan to trust, believe. See trust, true

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World English Dictionary
trow (trəʊ)
 
vb
archaic to think, believe, or trust
 
[Old English treow; related to Old Frisian triūwe, Old Saxon treuwa, Old High German triuwa; see troth, true]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

trow
O.E. treowian "to trust, believe," from treow "faith, belief," from P.Gmc. *truwian (see true). Cognate with Ger. trauen.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

trow

in early Scandinavian folklore, giant, monstrous being, sometimes possessing magic powers. Hostile to men, trolls lived in castles and haunted the surrounding districts after dark. If exposed to sunlight they burst or turned to stone. In later tales trolls often are man-sized or smaller beings similar to dwarfs and elves. They live in mountains, sometimes steal human maidens, and can transform themselves and prophesy. In the Shetland and Orkney islands, Celtic areas once settled by Scandinavians, trolls are called trows and appear as small malign creatures who dwell in mounds or near the sea. In the plays of the Norwegian dramatist Henrik Ibsen, especially Peer Gynt (1867) and The Master Builder (1892), trolls are used as symbols of destructive instincts. Trolls in modern tales for children often live under bridges, menacing travelers and exacting tasks or tolls.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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