trustee

[truh-stee] Law.
noun
1.
a person, usually one of a body of persons, appointed to administer the affairs of a company, institution, etc.
2.
a person who holds the title to property for the benefit of another.
3.
(in New England) a garnishee.
4.
a trusty.
verb (used with object), trusteed, trusteeing.
5.
to place in the hands of a trustee or trustees.
6.
(in New England) to garnish.

Origin:
1640–50; trust + -ee

1. executor, trustee, trusty ; 2. trustee, trusty.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
trustee (trʌˈstiː)
 
n
1.  a person to whom the legal title to property is entrusted to hold or use for another's benefit
2.  a member of a board that manages the affairs and administers the funds of an institution or organization

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Example sentences
The trusts would then invest in preserving the natural world, though selecting
  trustworthy trustees might prove a challenge.
Participants were instructed to act as investors during multiple rounds of a
  trust game with different trustees.
He is also chairman of the executive committee of its board of trustees.
Government is competent when all who compose it work as trustees for the whole
  people.
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