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tucker1

[tuhk-er] /ˈtʌk ər/
noun
1.
a person or thing that tucks.
2.
a piece of linen, muslin, or the like, worn by women about the neck and shoulders.
4.
a sewing machine attachment for making tucks.
5.
Australian, food.
Origin
1225-1275
1225-75; Middle English tokere. See tuck1, -er1

tucker2

[tuhk-er] /ˈtʌk ər/
verb (used with object), Informal.
1.
to weary; tire; exhaust (often followed by out):
The game tuckered him out.
Origin
1825-35, Americanism; tuck1 + -er6

Tucker

[tuhk-er] /ˈtʌk ər/
noun
1.
Richard, 1915–75, U.S. operatic tenor.
2.
Sophie (Sophie Abruza) 1884–1966, U.S. singer and entertainer, born in Russia.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for tucker
  • tucker created false and fraudulent loan applications for several of his extended family members, including his in-laws.
  • tucker has again failed to state a claim upon which relief can be granted.
  • Crocs can go months without tucker and they can hibernate.
  • tucker came to hold the position that no rights exist until they are created by contract.
British Dictionary definitions for tucker

tucker1

/ˈtʌkə/
noun
1.
a person or thing that tucks
2.
a detachable yoke of lace, linen, etc, often white, worn over the breast, as of a low-cut dress
3.
an attachment on a sewing machine used for making tucks at regular intervals
4.
(Austral & NZ, old-fashioned) an informal word for food

tucker2

/ˈtʌkə/
verb
1.
(informal, mainly US & Canadian) (transitive; often passive) usually foll by out. to weary or tire completely
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for tucker
n.

"piece of lace worn around the neck," 1680s, from Middle English tokker "tucker, one who dresses or finishes cloth" (see tuck).

v.

"to tire, weary," 1833, New England slang, of uncertain origin, perhaps from tucked (past participle of tuck (v.)), which had, in reference to dogs, a slang sense of "exhausted, underfed." Related: Tuckered; tuckering.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for tucker

tuchis

Related Terms

tokus


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Idioms and Phrases with tucker

tucker

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Word Value for tucker

12
14
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