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turmoil

[tur-moil] /ˈtɜr mɔɪl/
noun
1.
a state of great commotion, confusion, or disturbance; tumult; agitation; disquiet:
mental turmoil caused by difficult decisions.
2.
Obsolete. harassing labor.
Origin of turmoil
1505-1515
1505-15; orig. as v.: to agitate; etymology uncertain; perhaps tur(n) + moil
Synonyms
1. turbulence, disorder, uproar. See agitation.
Antonyms
1. order, quiet.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for turmoil
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • But it has vigor, vividness and sincere emotion, and through it all runs the turmoil and thunder of the battle.

  • All the agitation and turmoil of the last few months seemed to fall away from him.

    The Avenger E. Phillips Oppenheim
  • Yesterday, when Flora and I sat at our sewing in the manse parlour, something happened which has set everything in a turmoil.

    Out in the Forty-Five Emily Sarah Holt
  • Just think of it—all that fuss and all that turmoil over something so obvious.

    Mountain Meditations L. Lind-af-Hageby
  • In 1670, when Carteret attempted to collect quit-rents, the settlers refused to pay, and for two years the colony was in turmoil.

    The Colonization of North America Herbert Eugene Bolton
British Dictionary definitions for turmoil

turmoil

/ˈtɜːmɔɪl/
noun
1.
violent or confused movement; agitation; tumult
verb
2.
(archaic) to make or become turbulent
Word Origin
C16: perhaps from turn + moil
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for turmoil
n.

1520s, perhaps an alteration of Middle French tremouille "mill hopper," in reference to the hopper's constant motion to and fro, from Latin trimodia "vessel containing three modii," from modius, a Roman dry measure, related to modus "measure." Attested earlier in English as a verb (1510s), though this now is obsolete.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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