turtler

turtle

1 [tur-tl]
noun, plural turtles (especially collectively) turtle.
1.
any reptile of the order Testudines, comprising aquatic and terrestrial species having the trunk enclosed in a shell consisting of a dorsal carapace and a ventral plastron.
2.
(not used technically) an aquatic turtle as distinguished from a terrestrial one. Compare tortoise ( def 1 ).
verb (used without object), turtled, turtling.
3.
to catch turtles, especially as a business.
Idioms
4.
turn turtle,
a.
Nautical. to capsize or turn over completely in foundering.
b.
to overturn; upset: Several of the cars turned turtle in the course of the race.

Origin:
1625–35; alteration (influenced by turtle2) of French tortue < Medieval Latin tortūca tortoise

turtler, noun
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World English Dictionary
turtle1 (ˈtɜːtəl)
 
n
1.  any of various aquatic chelonian reptiles, esp those of the marine family Chelonidae, having a flattened shell enclosing the body and flipper-like limbs adapted for swimmingRelated: chelonian, testudinal
2.  (US), (Canadian) any of the chelonian reptiles, including the tortoises and terrapins
3.  nautical a zip bag made as part of a spinnaker for holding the sail so that it can be set rapidly
4.  turn turtle to capsize
 
vb
5.  (intr) to catch or hunt turtles
 
Related: chelonian, testudinal
 
[C17: from French tortuetortoise (influenced by turtle²)]
 
'turtler1
 
n

turtle2 (ˈtɜːtəl)
 
n
an archaic name for turtledove
 
[Old English turtla, from Latin turtur, of imitative origin; related to German Turteltaube]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

turtle
reptile, 1609, "marine tortoise," from Fr. tortue "turtle, tortoise," of unknown origin. The Eng. word is perhaps a sailors' mauling of the French one, infl. by the similar sounding turtle (2). Later extended to land tortoises. Turtleneck "close-fitting collar" is recorded from 1895.

turtle
"turtledove," O.E. turtle, dissimilation of L. turtur "turtledove," a reduplicated form imitative of the bird's call. Graceful, harmonious and affectionate to its mate, hence a term of endearment in M.E. Turtledove is attested from c.1300.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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