follow Dictionary.com

Get our exclusive Word of the Day images!

astonish

[uh-ston-ish] /əˈstɒn ɪʃ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to fill with sudden and overpowering surprise or wonder; amaze:
Her easy humor and keen intellect astonished me.
Origin
dialectal Old French
1525-1535
1525-35; Middle English astonyen, astonen, probably < dialectal Old French *astoner, Old French estoner < Vulgar Latin *extonāre, for Latin attonāre to strike with lightning, equivalent to ex- ex-1, at- at- + tonāre to thunder; extended by -ish2, perhaps reflecting Anglo-French *astonir < dialectal Old French
Related forms
astonishedly, adverb
astonisher, noun
superastonish, verb
unastonished, adjective
Synonyms
astound, startle, shock. See surprise.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
British Dictionary definitions for un astonished

astonish

/əˈstɒnɪʃ/
verb
1.
(transitive) to fill with amazement; surprise greatly
Word Origin
C15: from earlier astonyen (see astonied), from Old French estoner, from Vulgar Latin extonāre (unattested) to strike with thunder, from Latin tonāre to thunder
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for un astonished
astonish
mid-14c., astonien, from O.Fr. estoner "to stun, daze, deafen, astound," from V.L. *extonare, from L. ex- "out" + tonare "to thunder" (see thunder); so, lit. "to leave someone thunderstruck." The modern form (influenced by English verbs in -ish, e.g. distinguish, diminish) is attested from c.1530. Related: Astonishment.
"No wonder is thogh that she were astoned" [Chaucer, "Clerk's Tale"]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of The Day

Difficulty index for astonish

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for un

2
4
Scrabble Words With Friends