Un banded

banded

[ban-did]
adjective
1.
marked or fitted with a band or bands.
2.
Architecture. (of a column, door architrave, etc.) having the regular flutings, moldings, or the like interrupted at regular intervals by projecting blocks or drums.

Origin:
1480–90; band2 + -ed2

interbanded, adjective
unbanded, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To un banded
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

band
"a flat strip," also "something that binds," a merger of two words, ultimately from the same source. In the sense "that by which someone or something is bound," it is attested from 1126, from O.N. band "thin strip that ties or constrains," from P.Gmc. *bindan (related to Mod.Eng. bend and bind), from
PIE *bendh- "to bind" (cf. Goth bandi "that which binds; Skt. bandhah "a tying, bandage," source of bandana; M.Ir. bainna "bracelet"). Most of the fig. senses of this word have passed into bond (q.v.), which originally was a phonetic variant of band. The meaning "a flat strip" (late 14c.) is from O.Fr. bande "strip, edge, side," via O.N.Fr. bende, from O.H.G. binda, from P.Gmc. *bindan (see above). In M.E., this was distinguished by the spelling bande, but since the loss of the final -e the words have fully merged. Meaning "broad stripe of color" is from 1470; the electronics sense of "range of frequencies or wavelengths" is from 1922. The O.N.Fr. form was retained in heraldic bend.

band
"an organized group," late 15c., from M.Fr. bande , traceable to P.Gmc. root of band (1), probably via a band of cloth worn as a mark of identification by a group of soldiers or others (cf. Gothic bandwa "a sign"). The extension to "group of musicians" is c.1660, originally
musicians attached to a regiment of the army. To beat the band (1897) is to make enough noise to drown it out, hence to exceed everything.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

band (bānd)
n.

  1. An appliance or a part of an apparatus that encircles or binds a part of the body.

  2. A cordlike tissue that connects or that holds bodily structures together.

  3. A chromatically, structurally, or functionally differentiated strip or stripe in or on an organism.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Science Dictionary
band   (bānd)  Pronunciation Key 
A specific range of electromagnetic wavelengths or frequencies, as those used in radio broadcasting.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature