un booted

booted

[boo-tid]
adjective
1.
equipped with or wearing boots.
2.
Ornithology. (of the tarsus of certain birds) covered with a continuous horny, bootlike sheath.

Origin:
1545–55; boot1 + -ed3

unbooted, adjective
well-booted, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
booted (ˈbuːtɪd)
 
adj
1.  wearing boots
2.  ornithol
 a.  (of birds) having an undivided tarsus covered with a horny sheath
 b.  (of poultry) having a feathered tarsus

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

boot
"footwear," early 14c., from O.Fr. bote "boot" (12c.), with corresponding words in Prov. and Sp., of unknown origin, perhaps from a Gmc. source. Originally for riding boots only. The verb meaning "kick" is Amer.Eng. 1877; that of "eject" is from 1880.

boot
"profit, use," O.E. bot "help, relief, advantage; atonement," lit. "a making better," from P.Gmc. *boto (see better). Cf. Ger. Buße "penance, atonement," Goth. botha "advantage." Now mostly in phrase to boot (O.E. to bote).

boot
"start up a computer," 1975, from bootstrap (n.), 1953, "fixed sequence of instructions to load the operating system of a computer," on notion of the first-loaded program pulling itself, and the rest, up by the bootstraps.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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