un complimenting

compliment

[n. kom-pluh-muhnt; v. kom-pluh-ment]
noun
1.
an expression of praise, commendation, or admiration: A sincere compliment boosts one's morale.
2.
a formal act or expression of civility, respect, or regard: The mayor paid him the compliment of escorting him.
3.
compliments, a courteous greeting; good wishes; regards: He sends you his compliments.
4.
Archaic. a gift; present.
verb (used with object)
5.
to pay a compliment to: She complimented the child on his good behavior.
6.
to show kindness or regard for by a gift or other favor: He complimented us by giving a party in our honor.
7.
to congratulate; felicitate: to compliment a prince on the birth of a son.
verb (used without object)
8.
to pay compliments.

Origin:
1570–80; < French < Italian complimento < Spanish cumplimiento, equivalent to cumpli- (see comply) + -miento -ment; earlier identical in spelling with complement

complimentable, adjective
complimenter, noun
complimentingly, adverb
outcompliment, verb (used with object)
uncomplimented, adjective
uncomplimenting, adjective

complement, compliment (see usage note at complement).


1. kudos, tribute, eulogy, panegyric. 5. commend, praise, honor.


1. disparagement.


See complement.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
compliment
 
n
1.  a remark or act expressing respect, admiration, etc
2.  (usually plural) a greeting of respect or regard
 
vb
3.  to express admiration of; congratulate or commend
4.  to express or show respect or regard for, esp by a gift
 

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

compliment
1570s, via Fr., from It. complimento "expression of respect and civility," from V.L. *complire, for L. complere "to complete," via notion of "complete the obligations of politeness." Same word as complement but by a different etymological route; differentiated by spelling after 1650.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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