un domesticated

domesticate

[duh-mes-ti-keyt]
verb (used with object), domesticated, domesticating.
1.
to convert (animals, plants, etc.) to domestic uses; tame.
2.
to tame (an animal), especially by generations of breeding, to live in close association with human beings as a pet or work animal and usually creating a dependency so that the animal loses its ability to live in the wild.
3.
to adapt (a plant) so as to be cultivated by and beneficial to human beings.
4.
to accustom to household life or affairs.
5.
to take (something foreign, unfamiliar, etc.) for one's own use or purposes; adopt.
6.
to make more ordinary, familiar, acceptable, or the like: to domesticate radical ideas.
verb (used without object), domesticated, domesticating.
7.
to be domestic.

Origin:
1635–45; < Medieval Latin domesticātus (past participle of domesticāre), equivalent to domestic- domestic + -ātus -ate1

domesticable [duh-mes-ti-kuh-buhl] , adjective
domestication, noun
domesticative, adjective
domesticator, noun
nondomesticated, adjective
nondomesticating, adjective
overdomesticate, verb (used with object), overdomesticated, overdomesticating.
undomesticable, adjective
undomesticated, adjective
well-domesticated, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
domesticate or domesticize (dəˈmɛstɪˌkeɪt, dəˈmɛstɪˌsaɪz)
 
vb
1.  to bring or keep (wild animals or plants) under control or cultivation
2.  to accustom to home life
3.  to adapt to an environment: to domesticate foreign trees
 
domesticize or domesticize
 
vb
 
do'mesticable or domesticize
 
adj
 
domesti'cation or domesticize
 
n
 
do'mesticative or domesticize
 
adj
 
do'mesticator or domesticize
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

domesticate
1630s, of animals; 1741, of persons, "to cause to be attached to home and family;" from pp. stem of M.L. domesticare "to dwell in a house," from domesticus (see domestic). Related: Domesticated; domestication.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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