un forced

forced

[fawrst, fohrst]
adjective
1.
enforced or compulsory: forced labor.
2.
strained, unnatural, or affected: a forced smile.
3.
subjected to force.
4.
required by circumstances; emergency: a forced landing of an airplane.

Origin:
1540–50; force + -ed2

forcedly [fawr-sid-lee, fohr-] , adverb
forcedness, noun
quasi-forced, adjective
unforced, adjective
unforcedly, adverb
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
forced (fɔːst)
 
adj
1.  done because of force; compulsory: forced labour
2.  false or unnatural: a forced smile
3.  due to an emergency or necessity: a forced landing
4.  physics caused by an external agency: a forced vibration; a forced draught
 
forcedly
 
adv
 
'forcedness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

force
c.1300, from O.Fr. force, from L.L. fortia, from neut. pl. of L. fortis "strong" (see fort). Meaning "body of armed men, army" first recorded late 14c. The verb is first attested early 14c.; its original sense was "to ravish" (a woman). Related: Forced; forcing.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

force (fôrs)
n.

  1. The capacity to do work or cause physical change; energy, strength, or active power.

  2. A vector quantity that tends to produce an acceleration of a body in the direction of its application.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
force   (fôrs)  Pronunciation Key 
  1. Any of various factors that cause a body to change its speed, direction, or shape. force is a vector quantity, having both magnitude and direction. Contributions of force from different sources can be summed to give the net force at any given point.

  2. Any of the four natural phenomena involving the interaction between particles of matter. From the strongest to the weakest, the four forces are the strong nuclear force, the electromagnetic force, the weak nuclear force, and gravity.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

force definition


In physics, something that causes a change in the motion of an object. The modern definition of force (an object's mass multiplied by its acceleration) was given by Isaac Newton in Newton's laws of motion. The most familiar unit of force is the pound. (See mechanics.)

Note: Gravity, and therefore weight, is a kind of force.
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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