un imperative

imperative

[im-per-uh-tiv]
adjective
1.
absolutely necessary or required; unavoidable: It is imperative that we leave.
2.
of the nature of or expressing a command; commanding.
3.
Grammar. noting or pertaining to the mood of the verb used in commands, requests, etc., as in Listen! Go! Compare indicative ( def 2 ), subjunctive ( def 1 ).
noun
4.
a command.
5.
something that demands attention or action; an unavoidable obligation or requirement; necessity: It is an imperative that we help defend friendly nations.
6.
Grammar.
a.
the imperative mood.
b.
a verb in this mood.
7.
an obligatory statement, principle, or the like.

Origin:
1520–30; < Late Latin imperātivus, equivalent to Latin imperāt(us) past participle of imperāre to impose, order, command (im- im-1 + -per- (combining form of parāre to fur-nish (with), produce, obtain, prepare) + -ātus -ate1) + -īvus -ive

imperatively, adverb
imperativeness, noun
nonimperative, adjective
nonimperatively, adverb
nonimperativeness, noun
unimperative, adjective
unimperatively, adverb

imperative, imperial, imperious.


1. inescapable; indispensable, essential; exigent, compelling.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
imperative (ɪmˈpɛrətɪv)
 
adj
1.  extremely urgent or important; essential
2.  peremptory or authoritative: an imperative tone of voice
3.  grammar Also: imperatival denoting a mood of verbs used in giving orders, making requests, etc. In English the verb root without any inflections is the usual form, as for example leave in Leave me alone
 
n
4.  something that is urgent or essential
5.  an order or command
6.  grammar
 a.  the imperative mood
 b.  a verb in this mood
 
[C16: from Late Latin imperātīvus, from Latin imperāre to command]
 
im'peratively
 
adv
 
im'perativeness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

imperative
1530, from L.L. imperativus "pertaining to a command," from imperatus "commanded," pp. of imperare "to command, to requisition," from in- "in" + parare "beget, bear" (see pare).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

imperative definition


A grammatical category describing verbs that command or request: “Leave town by tonight”; “Please hand me the spoon.”

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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