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inebriate

[v. in-ee-bree-eyt, ih-nee-; n., adj. in-ee-bree-it, ih-nee-] /v. ɪnˈi briˌeɪt, ɪˈni-; n., adj. ɪnˈi bri ɪt, ɪˈni-/
verb (used with object), inebriated, inebriating.
1.
to make drunk; intoxicate.
2.
to exhilarate, confuse, or stupefy mentally or emotionally.
noun
3.
an intoxicated person.
4.
a habitual drunkard.
adjective
5.
Also, inebriated. drunk; intoxicated.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English < Latin inēbriātus past participle of inēbriāre to make drunk, equivalent to in- in-2 + ēbri(us) drunk + -ātus -ate1
Related forms
inebriation, noun
uninebriated, adjective
uninebriating, adjective
Synonyms
4. See drunkard.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for un inebriating

inebriate

verb (transitive) (ɪnˈiːbrɪˌeɪt)
1.
to make drunk; intoxicate
2.
to arouse emotionally; make excited
noun (ɪnˈiːbrɪɪt)
3.
a person who is drunk, esp habitually
adjective (ɪnˈiːbrɪɪt)
4.
drunk, esp habitually
Derived Forms
inebriation, noun
inebriety (ˌɪnɪˈbraɪɪtɪ) noun
Word Origin
C15: from Latin inēbriāre, from in-² + ēbriāre to intoxicate, from ēbrius drunk
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for un inebriating
inebriate
mid-15c., originally an adj., from L. inebriatus, pp. of inebriare "to make drunk," from in- "in" + ebriare "make drunk," from ebrius "drunk," of unknown origin. The verb meaning "to intoxicate" is first recorded late 15c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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2
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