un inhabitability

inhabit

[in-hab-it]
verb (used with object)
1.
to live or dwell in (a place), as people or animals: Small animals inhabited the woods.
2.
to exist or be situated within; dwell in: Weird notions inhabit his mind.
verb (used without object)
3.
Archaic. to live or dwell, as in a place.

Origin:
1325–75; < Latin inhabitāre, equivalent to in- in-2 + habitāre to dwell (see habit2); replacing Middle English enhabiten < Middle French enhabiter < Latin as above

inhabitable, adjective
inhabitability, noun
inhabitation, noun
noninhabitability, noun
noninhabitable, adjective
preinhabit, verb (used with object)
preinhabitation, noun
reinhabit, verb (used with object)
uninhabitability, noun
uninhabitable, adjective

habitable, inhabitable, uninhabitable.


1, 2. reside, occupy, tenant, populate.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
inhabit (ɪnˈhæbɪt)
 
vb , -its, -iting, -ited
1.  (tr) to live or dwell in; occupy
2.  archaic (intr) to abide or dwell
 
[C14: from Latin inhabitāre, from habitāre to dwell]
 
in'habitable
 
adj
 
inhabita'bility
 
n
 
inhabi'tation
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

inhabit
late 14c., from O.Fr. enhabiter "dwell in" (12c.), from L. inhabitare, from in- "in" + habitare "to dwell," frequentative of habere "hold, have" (see habit). Inhabitant first recorded mid-15c. Inhabitable was used in two opposite senses: "not habitable" (c.1400, from in- "not"
+ habitable) and "capable of being inhabited" (c.1600, from inhabit + -able).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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