Un ravished

ravish

[rav-ish]
verb (used with object)
1.
to fill with strong emotion, especially joy.
2.
to seize and carry off by force.
3.
to carry off (a woman) by force.
4.
to rape (a woman).

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English ravishen < Middle French raviss-, long stem of ravir to seize ≪ Latin rapere; see rape1

ravishedly, adverb
ravisher, noun
unravished, adjective

ravage, ravish.


1. enrapture, transport, enthrall, delight, captivate.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
ravish (ˈrævɪʃ)
 
vb
1.  (often passive) to give great delight to; enrapture
2.  to rape
3.  archaic to carry off by force
 
[C13: from Old French ravir, from Latin rapere to seize]
 
'ravisher
 
n
 
'ravishment
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

ravish
c.1300, "to seize (someone) by violence, carry (a person, esp. a woman) away," from O.Fr. raviss-, prp. stem of ravir "to seize, take away hastily," from V.L. *rapire, from L. rapere "to seize, hurry away" (see rapid). Meaning "to commit rape upon" is recorded from mid-15c.
Ravishing "act of plundering" is from c.1300; in the sense of "enchanting" it is attested from early 15c., from notion of "carrying off from earth to heaven" (early 14c.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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