un reformed

reformed

[ri-fawrmd]
adjective
1.
amended by removal of faults, abuses, etc.
2.
improved in conduct, morals, etc.
3.
(initial capital letter) noting or pertaining to Protestant churches, especially Calvinist as distinguished from Lutheran.

Origin:
1555–65; reform + -ed2

reformedly [ri-fawr-mid-lee] , adverb
pseudoreformed, adjective
quasi-reformed, adjective
unreformed, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
Reformed (rɪˈfɔːmd)
 
adj
1.  of or designating a Protestant Church, esp the Calvinist as distinct from the Lutheran
2.  of or designating Reform Judaism

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

reform
c.1300, "to convert into another and better form," from O.Fr. reformer (12c.), from L. reformare "to form again, change, alter," from re- "again" + formare "to form." The noun is 1660s, from the verb. Meaning "to bring (a person) away from an evil course of life" is recorded from early 15c.; of governments,
institutions, etc., from early 15c. Reformed churches (1588) usually are Calvinist as opposed to Lutheran. Reformed Judaism (1843) is a movement initiated in Germany by Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786). Reformatory "house of correction for juveniles" first recorded 1834. Reform school is attested from 1859.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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