Un sliding

sliding

[slahy-ding]
adjective
1.
rising or falling, increasing or decreasing, according to a standard or to a set of conditions.
2.
operated, adjusted, or moved by sliding: a sliding door.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English; Old English slīdende. See slide, -ing2

slidingly, adverb
slidingness, noun
unsliding, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
sliding (ˈslaɪdɪŋ)
 
adj
1.  rising or falling in accordance with given specifications: fees were charged as a sliding percentage of income
2.  regulated or moved by sliding

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

slide
O.E. slidan "move smoothly, glide," from P.Gmc. *slidanan (cf. O.H.G. slito, Ger. Schlitten "sledge"), from PIE base *(s)lei- "slide" (cf. Lith. slystu "to glide, slide," O.C.S. sledu "track," Gk. olisthos "slipperiness," olisthanein "to slip," M.Ir. sloet "slide"). Phrase to let (something) slide is
recorded from c.1386. The noun is 1570, from the verb. Meaning "picture prepared for use with a projector" is attested from 1819 (in magic lantern shows). Slider as a type of baseball pitch is recorded from 1936. Slide-rule as a calculating tool is from 1838.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

slide (slīd)
n.
A small glass plate for mounting specimens to be examined under a microscope.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
slide   (slīd)  Pronunciation Key 
  1. A mass movement of earth, rocks, snow, or ice down a slope. Slides can be caused by an accumulation of new matter or of moisture in the overlying material, or by erosion within or below the material. They are often triggered by an earthquake or other disturbance such as an explosion.

  2. The mass of material resulting from such a process.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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