un sparkling

sparkle

[spahr-kuhl]
verb (used without object), sparkled, sparkling.
1.
to issue in or as if in little sparks, as fire or light: The candlelight sparkled in the crystal.
2.
to emit little sparks, as burning matter: The flames leaped and sparkled.
3.
to shine or glisten with little gleams of light, as a brilliant gem; glitter; coruscate.
4.
to effervesce, as wine.
5.
to be brilliant, lively, or vivacious.
verb (used with object), sparkled, sparkling.
6.
to cause to sparkle: moonlight sparkling the water; pleasure sparkling her eyes.
noun
7.
a little spark or fiery particle.
8.
a sparkling appearance, luster, or play of light: the sparkle of a diamond.
9.
brilliance, liveliness, or vivacity.

Origin:
1150–1200; Middle English (noun and v.); see spark1, -le

nonsparkling, adjective
outsparkle, verb (used with object), outsparkled, outsparkling.
unsparkling, adjective


3. See glisten. 8. glitter.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
sparkle (ˈspɑːkəl)
 
vb
1.  to issue or reflect or cause to issue or reflect bright points of light
2.  (intr) (of wine, mineral water, etc) to effervesce
3.  (intr) to be vivacious or witty
 
n
4.  a point of light, spark, or gleam
5.  vivacity or wit
 
[C12 sparklen, frequentative of sparken to spark1]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sparkle
c.1200, frequentative verb form of M.E. sparke (see spark). Of wines, from early 15c. The noun is first attested early 14c. Sparkler in the fireworks sense is from 1879.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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