un-circulated

circulate

[sur-kyuh-leyt]
verb (used without object), circulated, circulating.
1.
to move in a circle or circuit; move or pass through a circuit back to the starting point: Blood circulates throughout the body.
2.
to pass from place to place, from person to person, etc.: She circulated among her guests.
3.
to be distributed or sold, especially over a wide area.
4.
Library Science. (of books and other materials) to be available for borrowing by patrons of a library for a specified period of time.
verb (used with object), circulated, circulating.
5.
to cause to pass from place to place, person to person, etc.; disseminate; distribute: to circulate a rumor.
6.
Library Science. to lend (books and other materials) to patrons of a library for a specified period of time.

Origin:
1425–75 for earlier senses; 1665–75 for current senses; late Middle English < Latin circulātus (past participle of circulārī to gather round one, Medieval Latin circulāre to encircle), equivalent to circul(us) circle + -ātus -ate1

circulatable, adjective
circulative [sur-kyuh-ley-tiv, -luh-tiv] , adjective
circulatory [sur-kyuh-luh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] , adjective
intercirculate, verb, intercirculated, intercirculating.
noncirculating, adjective
noncirculatory, adjective
precirculate, verb, precirculated, precirculating.
recirculate, verb, recirculated, recirculating.
uncirculated, adjective
uncirculating, adjective
uncirculative, adjective
well-circulated, adjective


3. disperse, spread, promulgate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
circulate (ˈsɜːkjʊˌleɪt)
 
vb
1.  to send, go, or pass from place to place or person to person: don't circulate the news
2.  to distribute or be distributed over a wide area
3.  to move or cause to move through a circuit, system, etc, returning to the starting point: blood circulates through the body
4.  to move in a circle: the earth circulates around the sun
 
[C15: from Latin circulārī to assemble in a circle, from circuluscircle]
 
'circulative
 
adj
 
'circulator
 
n
 
'circulatory
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

circulate
1471, as a chemical term for alternating vaporization and condensation, from L. circulatus, pp. of circulare, from circulus (see circle). Meaning "to move around, revolve" is from 1670s; of blood, from 1656; of persons, "to mingle in a social gathering," from 1863. Sense
of "to pass about freely" is from 1664; of newspapers from 1885. Related: Circulating (1630s).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
circulate   (sûr'kyə-lāt')  Pronunciation Key 
To move in or flow through a circle or a circuit. Blood circulates through the body as it flows out from the heart to the tissues and back again.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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