Un-hindered

hinder

1 [hin-der]
verb (used with object)
1.
to cause delay, interruption, or difficulty in; hamper; impede: The storm hindered our progress.
2.
to prevent from doing, acting, or happening; stop: to hinder a man from committing a crime.
verb (used without object)
3.
to be an obstacle or impediment.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English hindren, Old English hindrian to hold back, equivalent to hinder hinder2 + -ian causative verb suffix

hinderer, noun
hinderingly, adverb
unhindered, adjective
unhindering, adjective
unhinderingly, adverb


1. encumber, obstruct, trammel. 2. block, thwart. See prevent.


1. encourage.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
hinder1 (ˈhɪndə)
 
vb
1.  to be or get in the way of (someone or something); hamper
2.  (tr) to prevent
 
[Old English hindrian; related to Old Norse hindra, Old High German hintarōn]
 
'hinderer1
 
n
 
'hindering1
 
adj, —n

hinder2 (ˈhaɪndə)
 
adj
(prenominal) situated at or further towards the back or rear; posterior: the hinder parts
 
[Old English; related to Old Norse hindri latter, Gothic hindar beyond, Old High German hintar behind]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

hinder
O.E. hindrian "to harm, injure, impair," from P.Gmc. *khinderojanan, from a root meaning "on that side of, behind" (cf. hind (adj.)); thus the ground sense is "to put or keep back." Cognate of O.N. hindra, Du. hinderen, Ger. hindern "to keep back."

hinder
"rear," O.E. hinder (adv.), possibly comparative of hind (adj.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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