un-ignited

ignite

[ig-nahyt]
verb (used with object), ignited, igniting.
1.
to set on fire; kindle.
2.
Chemistry. to heat intensely; roast.
verb (used without object), ignited, igniting.
3.
to take fire; begin to burn.

Origin:
1660–70; < Latin ignītus (past participle of ignīre to set on fire, ignite), equivalent to ign(is) fire + -ītus -ite2

ignitable, ignitible, adjective
ignitability, ignitibility, noun
nonignitability, noun
nonignitable, adjective
nonignitibility, noun
nonignitible, adjective
reignite, verb (used with object), reignited, reigniting.
unignitable, adjective
unignited, adjective
unigniting, adjective


1. See kindle1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
ignite (ɪɡˈnaɪt)
 
vb
1.  to catch fire or set fire to; burn or cause to burn
2.  (tr) chem to heat strongly
3.  (tr) to stimulate or provoke: the case has ignited a nationwide debate
 
[C17: from Latin ignīre to set alight, from ignis fire]
 
ig'nitable
 
adj
 
ig'nitible
 
adj
 
ignita'bility
 
n
 
igniti'bility
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

ignite
1646 (implied in ignitable), from L. ignitus, pp. of ignire "set fire." Attested earlier as an adj. (1560). Ignition is from 1612, "act of heating to the point of combustion;" meaning "means of sparking an internal combustion engine" is from 1881.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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