un-jealous

jealous

[jel-uhs]
adjective
1.
feeling resentment against someone because of that person's rivalry, success, or advantages (often followed by of ): He was jealous of his rich brother.
2.
feeling resentment because of another's success, advantage, etc. (often followed by of ): He was jealous of his brother's wealth.
3.
characterized by or proceeding from suspicious fears or envious resentment: a jealous rage; jealous intrigues.
4.
inclined to or troubled by suspicions or fears of rivalry, unfaithfulness, etc., as in love or aims: a jealous husband.
5.
solicitous or vigilant in maintaining or guarding something: The American people are jealous of their freedom.
6.
Bible. intolerant of unfaithfulness or rivalry: The Lord is a jealous God.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English jelous, gelos < Old French gelos (French jaloux) < Vulgar Latin *zēlōsus, equivalent to Late Latin zēl(us) zeal + ōsus -ose1

jealously, adverb
jealousness, noun
overjealous, adjective
overjealously, adverb
overjealousness, noun
unjealous, adjective
unjealously, adverb

enviable, envious, jealous.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
jealous (ˈdʒɛləs)
 
adj (often postpositive and foll by of) (often postpositive and foll by of)
1.  suspicious or fearful of being displaced by a rival: a jealous lover
2.  resentful (of) or vindictive (towards), esp through envy: a child jealous of his brother
3.  possessive and watchful in the maintenance or protection (of): jealous of one's reputation
4.  characterized by or resulting from jealousy
5.  obsolete, biblical or demanding exclusive loyalty: a jealous God
6.  an obsolete word for zealous
 
[C13: from Old French gelos, from Medieval Latin zēlōsus, from Late Latin zēlus emulation, jealousy, from Greek zēloszeal]
 
'jealously
 
adv
 
'jealousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

jealous
early 13c., from O.Fr. gelos (12c., Fr. jaloux), from L.L. zelosus, from zelus "zeal," from Gk. zelos, sometimes "jealousy," but more often in a good sense ("emulation, rivalry, zeal"). See zeal. Among the ways to express this are Swed. svartsjuka, lit. "black-sick," from phrase bara svarta strumpor
"wear black stockings," also "be jealous." Dan. skinsyg "jealous," lit. "skin-sick," is from skind "hide, skin" said to be explained by Swed. dial. expression fa skinn "receive a refusal in courtship."
"Most of the words for 'envy' ... had from the outset a hostile force, based on 'look at' (with malice), 'not love,' etc. Conversely, most of those which became distinctive terms for 'jealousy' were originally used also in a good sense, 'zeal, emulation.' " [Buck, pp.1138-9]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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