un-rejected

reject

[v. ri-jekt; n. ree-jekt]
verb (used with object)
1.
to refuse to have, take, recognize, etc.: to reject the offer of a better job.
2.
to refuse to grant (a request, demand, etc.).
3.
to refuse to accept (someone or something); rebuff: The other children rejected him. The publisher rejected the author's latest novel.
4.
to discard as useless or unsatisfactory: The mind rejects painful memories.
5.
to cast out or eject; vomit.
6.
to cast out or off.
7.
Medicine/Medical. (of a human or other animal) to have an immunological reaction against (a transplanted organ or grafted tissue): If tissue types are not matched properly, a patient undergoing a transplant will reject the graft.
noun
8.
something rejected, as an imperfect article.

Origin:
1485–95; (v.) < Latin rējectus, past participle of rējicere to throw back, equivalent to re- re- + jec-, combining form of jacere to throw + -tus past participle suffix

rejectable, adjective
rejecter, noun
rejective, adjective
prereject, verb (used with object)
quasi-rejected, adjective
unrejectable, adjective
unrejected, adjective
unrejective, adjective


1. See refuse1. 1, 2. deny. 3. repel, renounce. 4. eliminate, jettison. 8. second.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To un-rejected
Collins
World English Dictionary
reject
 
vb
1.  to refuse to accept, acknowledge, use, believe, etc
2.  to throw out as useless or worthless; discard
3.  to rebuff (a person)
4.  (of an organism) to fail to accept (a foreign tissue graft or organ transplant) because of immunological incompatibility
 
n
5.  something rejected as imperfect, unsatisfactory, or useless
 
[C15: from Latin rēicere to throw back, from re- + jacere to hurl]
 
re'jectable
 
adj
 
re'jecter
 
n
 
re'jector
 
n
 
re'jection
 
n
 
re'jective
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

reject
c.1415, from L. rejectus, pp. of reicere "to throw back," from re- "back" + -icere, comb. form of jacere "to throw" (see jet (v.)). The noun is first recorded 1555; rare before 20c. Rejection in the psychological sense, relating to parenting, is recorded from 1931.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

reject re·ject (rĭ-jěkt')
v. re·ject·ed, re·ject·ing, re·jects

  1. To refuse to accept, submit to, believe, or use something.

  2. To discard as defective or useless; throw away.

  3. To spit out or vomit.

  4. To resist immunologically introduction of a transplanted organ or tissue; fail to accept in one's body.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature