Un-trusting

trusting

[truhs-ting]
adjective
inclined to trust; confiding; trustful: a trusting child.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English; see trust, -ing2

trustingly, adverb
trustingness, noun
nontrusting, adjective
self-trusting, adjective
untrusting, adjective


unsuspicious, innocent, naive, unwary.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

trust
c.1200, from O.N. traust "help, confidence," from P.Gmc. *traust- (cf. O.Fris. trast, Du. troost "comfort, consolation," O.H.G. trost "trust, fidelity," Ger. Trost "comfort, consolation," Goth. trausti "agreement, alliance"). Related to O.E. treowian "to believe, trust," and treowe "faithful, trusty"
(see true). Meaning "businesses organized to reduce competition" is recorded from 1877. The verb (early 13c.) is from O.N. treysta "to trust." Trust-buster is recorded from 1903. Trustee in the sense of "person who is responsible for the property of another" is attested from 1650s. Trustworthy is first attested 1808.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

trust definition


A combination of firms or corporations for the purpose of reducing competition and controlling prices throughout a business or industry. Trusts are generally prohibited or restricted by antitrust legislation. (Compare monopoly.)

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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