un-trying

trying

[trahy-ing]
adjective
extremely annoying, difficult, or the like; straining one's patience and goodwill to the limit: a trying day; a trying experience.

Origin:
1570–80 for general sense; 1710–20 for current sense; try + -ing2

tryingly, adverb
tryingness, noun
untrying, adjective


irritating, irksome, bothersome, vexing.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
trying (ˈtraɪɪŋ)
 
adj
upsetting, difficult, or annoying: a trying day at the office
 
'tryingly
 
adv
 
'tryingness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

try
c.1300, "examine judiciously, sit in judgment of," from Anglo-Fr. trier (late 13c.), from O.Fr. trier "to pick out, cull" (12c.), from Gallo-Romance *triare, of unknown origin. The ground sense is "separate out (the good) by examination." Meaning "to test" is first recorded mid-14c.; that of "attempt
to do" is from early 14c. Sense of "to subject to some strain" (of patience, endurance, etc.) is recorded from 1530s. Trying "distressing" is first attested 1718. Try-out "trial of skill or ability" first recorded 1903. To try (something) on for size in the figurative sense is recorded from 1956.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

Try abbr.
tryptophan

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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