Un-wrecked

wreck

[rek]
noun
1.
any building, structure, or thing reduced to a state of ruin.
2.
wreckage, goods, etc., remaining above water after a shipwreck, especially when cast ashore.
3.
the ruin or destruction of a vessel in the course of navigation; shipwreck.
4.
a vessel in a state of ruin from disaster at sea, on rocks, etc.
5.
the ruin or destruction of anything: the wreck of one's hopes.
6.
a person of ruined health; someone in bad shape physically or mentally: The strain of his work left him a wreck.
verb (used with object)
7.
to cause the wreck of (a vessel); shipwreck.
8.
to involve in a wreck.
9.
to cause the ruin or destruction of: to wreck a car.
10.
to tear down; demolish: to wreck a building.
11.
to ruin or impair severely: Fast living wrecked their health.
verb (used without object)
12.
to be involved in a wreck; become wrecked: The trains wrecked at the crossing.
13.
to act as a wrecker; engage in wrecking.

Origin:
1200–50; (noun) Middle English wrec, wrech, wrek < Old Danish wrækæ wreck; (v.) late Middle English, derivative of the noun

unwrecked, adjective

1. rack, wrack, wreak, wreck ; 2. racked, wracked, wreaked, wrecked.


9. destroy, devastate, shatter. See spoil.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
wreck (rɛk)
 
vb
1.  to involve in or suffer disaster or destruction
2.  (tr) to cause the wreck of (a ship)
 
n
3.  a.  the accidental destruction of a ship at sea
 b.  the ship so destroyed
4.  maritime law goods cast ashore from a wrecked vessel
5.  a person or thing that has suffered ruin or dilapidation
6.  the remains of something that has been destroyed
7.  old-fashioned the act of wrecking or the state of being wrecked; ruin or destruction
 
[C13: from Scandinavian; compare Icelandic rek. See wrack², wreak]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

wreck
1228, "goods cast ashore after a shipwreck, flotsam," from Anglo-Fr. wrec, from O.N. *wrek (cf. Norw., Icel. rek) "wreck, flotsam," related to reka "to drive, push" (see wreak). The meaning "a shipwreck" is first recorded 1463; that of "a wrecked ship" is from 1500. General
sense of "remains of anything that has been ruined" is recorded from 1713; applied by 1795 to dissipated persons. The verb meaning "to destroy, ruin" is first recorded 1510. Wreckage is first attested 1837.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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