unadverse

adverse

[ad-vurs, ad-vurs]
adjective
1.
unfavorable or antagonistic in purpose or effect: adverse criticism.
2.
opposing one's interests or desire: adverse circumstances.
3.
being or acting in a contrary direction; opposed or opposing: adverse winds.
4.
opposite; confronting: the adverse page.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French advers < Latin adversus hostile (past participle of advertere), equivalent to ad- ad- + vert- turn + -tus past participle suffix, with -tt- > -s-

adversely, adverb
adverseness, noun
unadverse, adjective
unadversely, adverb
unadverseness, noun

adverse, averse (see usage note at the current entry).


1. hostile, inimical, unfriendly. 2. unfavorable; unlucky, unfortunate; disastrous, calamitous, catastrophic. See contrary.


1–3. favorable.


The adjectives adverse and averse are related both etymologically and semantically, each having “opposition” as a central sense. Adverse is seldom used of people but rather of effects or events, and it usually conveys a sense of hostility or harmfulness: adverse reviews; adverse winds; adverse trends in the economy. Related nouns are adversity and adversary: Adversities breed bitterness. His adversaries countered his every move. Averse is used of persons and means “feeling opposed or disinclined”; it often occurs idiomatically with a preceding negative to convey the opposite meaning “willing or agreeable,” and is not interchangeable with adverse in these contexts: We are not averse to holding another meeting. The related noun is aversion: She has a strong aversion to violence. Averse is usually followed by to, in older use occasionally by from.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
adverse (ˈædvɜːs, ædˈvɜːs)
 
adj
1.  antagonistic or inimical; hostile: adverse criticism
2.  unfavourable to one's interests: adverse circumstances
3.  contrary or opposite in direction or position: adverse winds
4.  Compare averse (of leaves, flowers, etc) facing the main stem
 
[C14: from Latin adversus opposed to, hostile, from advertere to turn towards, from ad- to, towards + vertere to turn]
 
ad'versely
 
adv
 
ad'verseness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

adverse
late 14c., from O.Fr. avers (Mod.Fr. adverse), from L. adversus "turned against," thus "hostile," pp. of advertere, from ad- "to" + vertere "to turn" (see versus).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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