unafflicting

afflict

[uh-flikt]
verb (used with object)
1.
to distress with mental or bodily pain; trouble greatly or grievously: to be afflicted with arthritis.
2.
Obsolete.
a.
to overthrow; defeat.
b.
to humble.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English afflicten < Latin afflīctus distressed, past participle of afflīgere to cast down (af- af- + flīg- knock + -tus past participle suffix); replacing Middle English aflight < Middle French aflit < L. See inflict

afflictedness, noun
afflicter, noun
overafflict, verb (used with object)
preafflict, verb (used with object)
self-afflicting, adjective
unafflicted, adjective
unafflictedly, adverb
unafflictedness, noun
unafflicting, adjective

afflict, infect, inflict.


1. vex, harass, torment, plague.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
afflict (əˈflɪkt)
 
vb
(tr) to cause suffering or unhappiness to; distress greatly
 
[C14: from Latin afflictus, past participle of afflīgere to knock against, from flīgere to knock, to strike]
 
af'flictive
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

afflict
late 14c., "to cast down," from O.Fr. afflicter, from L. afflictare "to damage, harass, torment," freq. of affligere (pp. afflictus) "to dash down, overthrow," from ad- "to" + fligere (pp. flictus) "to strike," from PIE base *bhlig- "to strike" (cf. Gk. phlibein "to press, crush," Czech blizna "scar,"
Welsh blif "catapult"). Transf. meaning of "trouble, distress," is first recorded 1530s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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