unbearable

[uhn-bair-uh-buhl]
adjective
not bearable; unendurable; intolerable.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English; see un-1, bearable

unbearableness, noun
unbearably, adverb
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
unbearable (ʌnˈbɛərəbəl)
 
adj
not able to be borne or endured
 
un'bearableness
 
n
 
un'bearably
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

unbearable
mid-15c., from un- (1) "not" + bear (v.) + -able. Related: Unbearably.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
For the millions of people who suffer from phobias, the ordinary can become
  unbearable.
Confidentiality in some of those cases was nearly an unbearable burden.
With little ventilation in the room, the onslaught is nearly unbearable if you
  aren't used to it.
They have suffered under a duplex burden of heat and humidity which has seemed
  almost unbearable.
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