unbearable

[uhn-bair-uh-buhl]
adjective
not bearable; unendurable; intolerable.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English; see un-1, bearable

unbearableness, noun
unbearably, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To unbearably
Collins
World English Dictionary
unbearable (ʌnˈbɛərəbəl)
 
adj
not able to be borne or endured
 
un'bearableness
 
n
 
un'bearably
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

unbearable
mid-15c., from un- (1) "not" + bear (v.) + -able. Related: Unbearably.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Older people that do are either unbearably dull or lying about their own
  youthful activities.
Though my experience of your commentary is almost unbearably negative, one
  could extract a positive way forward from it.
It is a useful feature in poor countries where the diet might otherwise be
  unbearably bland and stodgy.
Twelve unbearably gifted students are sitting around the table, and they
  appreciate having such perimeters established.
Related Words
Related Searches
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature