unbevelled

bevel

[bev-uhl]
noun
1.
the inclination that one line or surface makes with another when not at right angles.
2.
a surface that does not form a right angle with adjacent surfaces. Compare chamfer.
3.
(of a lock bolt) the oblique end that hits the strike plate.
4.
(of a lock with a beveled bolt) the side facing in the same direction as the bevel at the end of the bolt. Compare regular bevel, reverse bevel.
6.
an adjustable instrument for drawing angles or adjusting the surface of work to a particular inclination.
7.
Printing. beard ( def 5 ).
verb (used with object), verb (used without object), beveled, beveling or (especially British) bevelled, bevelling.
8.
to cut or slant at a bevel: to bevel an edge to prevent splintering.
adjective
9.
Also, beveled;, especially British, bevelled. oblique; sloping; slanted.

Origin:
1555–65; < Middle French *bevel (French béveau, biveau), Old French *baivel, equivalent to baïf with open mouth (ba(er) to gape (see bay2) + -if -ive) + -el < Latin -ellus; see -elle

beveler; especially British, beveller, noun
unbeveled, adjective
unbevelled, adjective
underbeveling, noun
underbevelling, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
bevel (ˈbɛvəl)
 
n
1.  a.  Compare chamfer Also called: cant a surface that meets another at an angle other than a right angle
 b.  (as modifier): a bevel edge; bevel square
 
vb , -els, -elling, -elled, -els, -eling, -eled
2.  (intr) to be inclined; slope
3.  (tr) to cut a bevel on (a piece of timber, etc)
 
[C16: from Old French bevel (unattested), from baïf, from baer to gape; see bay1]
 
'bevelled
 
adj
 
'beveled
 
adj
 
'beveller
 
n
 
'beveler
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

bevel
1560s, possibly from O.Fr. *baivel (Mod.Fr. béveau, biveau), from bayer "to gape, yawn," from L. *batare "to yawn, gape," from L. root *bat-, possibly imitative of yawning. The verb is first recorded 1670s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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