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uncanny

[uhn-kan-ee] /ʌnˈkæn i/
adjective
1.
having or seeming to have a supernatural or inexplicable basis; beyond the ordinary or normal; extraordinary:
uncanny accuracy; an uncanny knack of foreseeing trouble.
2.
mysterious; arousing superstitious fear or dread; uncomfortably strange:
Uncanny sounds filled the house.
Origin
1590-1600
1590-1600; un-1 + canny
Related forms
uncannily, adverb
uncanniness, noun
Synonyms
2. preternatural, odd. See weird.
Antonyms
2. ordinary, natural.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for uncannily
  • His judgment proved uncannily accurate: by the end of his career the hits far outweighed the misses.
  • Sometimes the artists uncannily reflect the history and culture of their place.
  • When they met, they discovered that they cooked uncannily well as a team and became best buddies.
  • Well naturally, but the specifics are uncannily interesting.
  • For centuries, mathematicians have been uncannily accurate in predicting the physical world.
  • While the food may be homely, its presentation is uncannily neat.
  • The machine code of the genes is uncannily computerlike.
  • The science is uncannily true, with rare exceptions.
  • Praise tends to focus on his uncannily authentic-sounding dialogue, which manages to bring even marginal characters to life.
  • The phrase refers to modern species that are uncannily similar to extinct ones.
British Dictionary definitions for uncannily

uncanny

/ʌnˈkænɪ/
adjective
1.
characterized by apparently supernatural wonder, horror, etc
2.
beyond what is normal or expected: an uncanny accuracy
Derived Forms
uncannily, adverb
uncanniness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for uncannily

uncanny

adj.

1590s, "mischievous;" 1773 in the sense of "associated with the supernatural," originally Scottish and northern English, from un- (1) "not" + canny.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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