Uncastigated

castigate

[kas-ti-geyt]
verb (used with object), castigated, castigating.
1.
to criticize or reprimand severely.
2.
to punish in order to correct.

Origin:
1600–10; < Latin castīgātus literally, driven to be faultless (past participle of castigāre to chasten), equivalent to cast(us) pure, chaste + -īg-, combining form of agere to drive, incite + -ātus -ate1

castigation, noun
castigative, castigatory [kas-ti-guh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] , adjective
castigator, noun
noncastigating, adjective
noncastigation, noun
self-castigating, adjective
self-castigation, noun
uncastigated, adjective
uncastigative, adjective


1. scold, reprove. 2. discipline, chastise, chasten.
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World English Dictionary
castigate (ˈkæstɪˌɡeɪt)
 
vb
(tr) to rebuke or criticize in a severe manner; chastise
 
[C17: from Latin castīgāre to correct, punish, from castum pure + agere to compel (to be)]
 
casti'gation
 
n
 
'castigator
 
n
 
casti'gatory
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

castigate
1607, from L. castigatus pp. of castigare "to purify, chastise," from castus "pure" (see caste) + agere "to do." Sense of "make someone pure by correcting or reproving him."
"If thou didst put this soure cold habit on To castigate thy pride, 'twere well." [Shakespeare, "Timon" IV.iii (1607)]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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