follow Dictionary.com

Yours, Etc.: Origins and Uses of 8 Sign-Offs

title

[tahyt-l] /ˈtaɪt l/
noun
1.
the distinguishing name of a book, poem, picture, piece of music, or the like.
2.
a descriptive heading or caption, as of a chapter, section, or other part of a book.
4.
a descriptive or distinctive appellation, especially one belonging to a person by right of rank, office, attainment, etc.:
the title of Lord Mayor.
5.
Sports. the championship:
He won the title three years in a row.
6.
an established or recognized right to something.
7.
a ground or basis for a claim.
8.
anything that provides a ground or basis for a claim.
9.
Law.
  1. legal right to the possession of property, especially real property.
  2. the ground or evidence of such right.
  3. the instrument constituting evidence of such right.
  4. a unity combining all of the requisites to complete legal ownership.
  5. a division of a statute, lawbook, etc., especially one larger than an article or section.
  6. (in pleading) the designation of one's basis for judicial relief; the cause of action sued upon, as a contract or tort.
10.
Ecclesiastical.
  1. a fixed sphere of work and source of income, required as a condition of ordination.
  2. any of certain Roman Catholic churches in Rome, the nominal incumbents of which are cardinals.
11.
Usually, titles. Movies, Television.
  1. a subtitle in the viewer's own language:
    an Italian movie with English titles.
  2. any written matter inserted into the film or program, especially the list of actors, technicians, writers, etc., contributing to it; credits.
adjective
12.
of or pertaining to a title:
the title story in a collection.
13.
that decides a title:
a title bout.
verb (used with object), titled, titling.
14.
to furnish with a title; designate by an appellation; entitle.
Origin
950
before 950; Middle English, variant of titel, Old English titul < Latin titulus superscription, title
Related forms
mistitle, verb (used with object), mistitled, mistitling.
nontitle, adjective
retitle, verb (used with object), retitled, retitling.
undertitle, noun
Synonyms
4. designation, denomination. See name. 14. denominate, term, call, style.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
British Dictionary definitions for under title

title

/ˈtaɪtəl/
noun
1.
the distinctive name of a work of art, musical or literary composition, etc
2.
a descriptive name, caption, or heading of a section of a book, speech, etc
3.
4.
a name or epithet signifying rank, office, or function
5.
a formal designation, such as Mr, Mrs, or Miss
6.
an appellation designating nobility
7.
(films)
  1. short for subtitle (sense 2)
  2. written material giving credits in a film or television programme
8.
(sport) a championship
9.
(property law)
  1. the legal right to possession of property, esp real property
  2. the basis of such right
  3. the documentary evidence of such right: title deeds
10.
(law)
  1. the heading or a division of a statute, book of law, etc
  2. the heading of a suit or action at law
11.
  1. any customary or established right
  2. a claim based on such a right
12.
a definite spiritual charge or office in the church, without appointment to which a candidate for holy orders cannot lawfully be ordained
13.
(RC Church) a titular church
verb
14.
(transitive) to give a title to
Word Origin
C13: from Old French, from Latin titulus
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for under title

title

n.

c.1300, "inscription, heading," from Old French title (12c.), and in part from Old English titul, both from Latin titulus "inscription, heading," of unknown origin. Meaning "name of a book, play, etc." first recorded mid-14c. The sense of "name showing a person's rank" is first attested 1580s.

v.

"to furnish with a title," late 14c., from title (n.). Related: Titled; titling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for title

All English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for under

6
8
Scrabble Words With Friends