under weigh

weigh

2 [wey]
Idioms
under weigh, Nautical. in motion; under way.

Origin:
1775–85; spelling variant of way1 by association with weigh anchor

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World English Dictionary
weigh1 (weɪ)
 
vb (often foll by out) (often foll by on)
1.  (tr) to measure the weight of
2.  (intr) to have weight or be heavy: she weighs more than her sister
3.  to apportion according to weight
4.  (tr) to consider carefully: to weigh the facts of a case
5.  (intr) to be influential: his words weighed little with the jury
6.  to be oppressive or burdensome (to)
7.  obsolete to regard or esteem
8.  weigh anchor to raise a vessel's anchor or (of a vessel) to have its anchor raised preparatory to departure
 
[Old English wegan; related to Old Frisian wega, Old Norse vega, Gothic gawigan, German wiegen]
 
'weighable1
 
adj
 
'weigher1
 
n

weigh2 (weɪ)
 
n
under weigh a variant spelling of under way
 
[C18: variation due to the influence of phrases such as to weigh anchor]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

weigh
O.E. wegan "find the weight of, have weight, lift, carry," from P.Gmc. *weganan (cf. O.S. wegan, O.Fris. wega, Du. wegen "to weigh," O.N. vega, O.H.G. wegan "to move, carry, weigh," Ger. wiegen "to weigh"), from PIE *wegh- "to move" (cf. Skt. vahati "carries, conveys," vahitram "vessel, ship;" Avestan
vazaiti "he leads, draws;" Gk. okhos "carriage;" L. vehere "to carry, convey;" O.C.S. vesti "to carry, convey;" Lith. vezu "to carry, convey;" O.Ir. fecht "campaign, journey"). The original sense was of motion, which led to that of lifting, then to that of "measure the weight of." The older sense of "lift, carry" survives in the nautical phrase weigh anchor. Fig. sense of "to consider, ponder" (in ref. to words, etc.) is recorded from 1340.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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