unfilling

filling

[fil-ing]
noun
1.
an act or instance of filling.
2.
something that is put in to fill something else: They used sand as filling for the depression.
3.
Dentistry. a substance such as cement, amalgam, gold, or the like, used to fill a cavity caused by decay in a tooth.
4.
a food mixture that goes into something, as if to fill it: sandwich filling; pie filling.
5.
Also called pick, weft, woof. Textiles. yarn carried by the shuttle and interlacing at right angles with the warp in woven cloth.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English; see fill, -ing1

self-filling, adjective
unfilling, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
filling (ˈfɪlɪŋ)
 
n
1.  the substance or thing used to fill a space or container: pie filling
2.  dentistry
 a.  any of various substances (metal, plastic, etc) for inserting into the prepared cavity of a tooth
 b.  the cavity of a tooth so filled
3.  textiles another term for weft
 
adj
4.  (of food or a meal) substantial and satisfying

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

fill
O.E. fyllan, from P.Gmc. *fullijan (cf. O.S. fulljan, O.N. fylla, O.Fris. fella, Du. vullen, Ger. füllen "to fill"), a derivative of adj. *fullaz "full." The related noun meaning "a full supply" is M.E. fille, from O.E. fylle. To fill the bill (1882) was originally U.S. theatrical slang, in reference
to a star whose name would be the only one on a show's poster. Related: Filled; filling.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

filling fill·ing (fĭl'ĭng)
n.
Material, such as amalgam, gold, or a synthetic resin, used to fill a cavity in a tooth.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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