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flying

[flahy-ing] /ˈflaɪ ɪŋ/
adjective
1.
making flight or passing through the air; that flies:
a flying insect; an unidentified flying object.
2.
floating, fluttering, waving, hanging, or moving freely in the air:
flying banners; flying hair.
3.
extending through the air.
4.
moving swiftly.
5.
made while moving swiftly:
a flying leap.
6.
very hasty or brief; fleeting or transitory:
a flying visit; a flying remark.
7.
designed or organized for swift movement or action.
8.
fleeing, running away, or taking flight:
They pursued the flying enemy.
9.
Nautical. (of a sail) having none of its edges fastened to spars or stays.
noun
10.
the act of moving through the air on wings; flight.
adverb
11.
Nautical. without being fastened to a yard, stay, or the like:
a sail set flying.
Origin
1000
before 1000; Middle English (noun); Old English flēogende (adj.). See fly1, -ing2, -ing1
Related forms
nonflying, adjective
unflying, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for unflying

flying

/ˈflaɪɪŋ/
adjective
1.
(prenominal) hurried; fleeting: a flying visit
2.
(prenominal) designed for fast action
3.
(prenominal) moving or passing quickly on or as if on wings: a flying leap, the flying hours
4.
hanging, waving, or floating freely: flying hair
5.
(nautical) (of a sail) not hauled in tight against the wind
noun
6.
the act of piloting, navigating, or travelling in an aircraft
7.
(modifier) relating to, capable of, accustomed to, or adapted for flight: a flying machine
related
adjective volant
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for unflying

flying

adj.

Old English fleogende "flying, winged," present participle of fly (v.1). Flying buttress is from 1660s; flying fish is from 1510s. Flying saucer first attested 1947, though the image of saucers for unidentified flying objects is from at least 1880s. Flying Dutchman, ghost ship off the Cape of Good Hope, attested since 1803 [John Leyden, "Scenes of Infancy," who describes it as "a common superstition of mariners"]. Flying colors (1706) probably is from the image of a naval vessel with the national flag bravely displayed.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for unflying

flying

adjective

Useless; worthless •Used to emphasize terms meaning ''something of little value,'' all probably variations and euphemisms of a flying fuck (1940s+)

Related Terms

have the rag on


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Encyclopedia Article for unflying

flying

in animals, locomotion of either of two basic types-powered, or true, flight and gliding. Winged (true) flight is found only in insects (most orders), most birds, and bats. The evolutionary modifications necessary for true flight in warm-blooded animals include those of the forelimbs into wings; lightening and fusion of bones; shortening of the torso; enlargement of the heart and thoracic muscles; and improved vision. Similar modifications in insects have occurred through different evolutionary pathways. The advantages conferred by flight are also great: in terms of numbers of species as well as numbers of individuals, insects, birds, and bats are among the most successful animal groups

Learn more about flying with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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