foresee

[fawr-see, fohr-]
verb (used with object), foresaw, foreseen, foreseeing.
1.
to have prescience of; to know in advance; foreknow.
2.
to see beforehand.
verb (used without object), foresaw, foreseen, foreseeing.
3.
to exercise foresight.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English; Old English foresēon. See fore-, see1

foreseeable, adjective
foreseeability, noun
foreseer, noun
unforeseeable, adjective
unforeseeableness, noun
unforeseeably, adverb
unforeseeing, adjective
unforeseen, adjective
well-foreseen, adjective


1. divine, discern. See predict.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
foresee (fɔːˈsiː)
 
vb , -sees, -seeing, -saw, -seen
(tr; may take a clause as object) to see or know beforehand: he did not foresee that
 
fore'seeable
 
adj
 
fore'seer
 
n

unforeseeable (ˌʌnfɔːˈsiːəbəl)
 
adj
not able to be foreseen or known beforehand

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

foresee
O.E. forseon "have a premonition," from fore- "before" + seon "to see, see ahead." Related: Foresaw; foreseeable; foreseen.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It seems some unforeseeable catastrophe will be required to bring us to our
  senses.
But the disease has left us in such a grip that breaking this toxic cycle seems
  unforeseeable.
Make sure you have access to additional funds in case your fare runs higher due
  to traffic or other unforeseeable factors.
Decide what to pack, and then double it in case of travel delay, cancellation
  or other unforeseeable events.
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