unhinted

hint

[hint]
noun
1.
an indirect, covert, or helpful suggestion; clue: Give me a hint as to his identity.
2.
a very slight or hardly noticeable amount; soupçon: a hint of garlic in the salad dressing.
3.
perceived indication or suggestion; note; intimation: a hint of spring in the air.
4.
Obsolete. an occasion or opportunity.
verb (used with object)
5.
to give a hint of: gray skies hinting a possible snowfall.
verb (used without object)
6.
to make indirect suggestion or allusion; subtly imply (usually followed by at ): The article hinted at corruption in the mayor's office.

Origin:
1595–1605; (noun) orig., opportunity, occasion, apparently variant of obsolete hent grasp, act of seizing, derivative of the v.: to grasp, take, Middle English henten, Old English hentan; (v.) derivative of the noun

hinter, noun
unhinted, adjective


1. allusion, insinuation, innuendo; memorandum, reminder; inkling. 5. imply. Hint, intimate, insinuate, suggest denote the conveying of an idea to the mind indirectly or without full or explicit statement. To hint is to convey an idea covertly or indirectly, but intelligibly: to hint that one would like a certain present; to hint that bits of gossip might be true. To intimate is to give a barely perceptible hint, often with the purpose of influencing action: to intimate that something may be possible. To insinuate is to hint artfully, often at what one would not dare to say directly: to insinuate something against someone's reputation. Suggest denotes particularly recalling something to the mind or starting a new train of thought by means of association of ideas: The name doesn't suggest anything to me.


5. express, declare.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
hint (hɪnt)
 
n
1.  a suggestion or implication given in an indirect or subtle manner: he dropped a hint
2.  a helpful piece of advice or practical suggestion
3.  a small amount; trace
 
vb (when intr, often foll by at; when tr, takes a clause as object)
4.  to suggest or imply indirectly
 
[C17: of uncertain origin]
 
'hinter
 
n
 
'hinting
 
n
 
'hintingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

hint
1604, from obsolete hent, from O.E. hentan "to seize," from P.Gmc. *khantijanan (cf. Goth. hinþan "to seize"), related to hunt. Modern sense and spelling first attested in Shakespeare.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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